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Go Natural

Interacting with nature has been linked to numerous cognitive benefits, including improved memory and creativity, reduced stress levels, and increased attention and focus. In this blog post, we will delve into the science behind these benefits and explore why it is so important to get outside and engage with the natural world.

One of the most well-known benefits of interacting with nature is its ability to reduce stress levels. Research has found that simply spending time in green spaces, such as parks or forests, can significantly lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol (Kaplan & Kaplan, 1989). Furthermore, studies have shown that people who live near green spaces have lower rates of depression and anxiety (Berman, et al., 2008).


In addition to reducing stress, interacting with nature has also been shown to improve memory and creativity. A study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology found that people who took a walk in nature had a significant improvement in their ability to recall words and complete a creativity test compared to those who walked in a more urban environment (Manski, et al., 2015).


Another cognitive benefit of interacting with nature is increased attention and focus. A study published in the journal Attention, Perception & Psychophysics found that people who took a nature walk showed a significant improvement in their ability to sustain attention compared to those who took a walk in an urban environment (Kaplan, 1995). Furthermore, a study published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology found that participants who completed a nature walk had a lower rate of mind-wandering compared to those who walked in an urban environment (Berto, 2005).


Finally, interacting with nature has also been linked to improved mood and well-being. A study published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology found that people who spent time in nature reported increased feelings of happiness and well-being compared to those who spent time in an urban environment (Berto, 2014).

In conclusion, interacting with nature has numerous cognitive benefits, including reduced stress levels, improved memory and creativity, increased attention and focus, and improved mood and well-being. With the rise of technology and urbanization, it is more important than ever to get outside and engage with the natural world. Whether it's taking a walk in a park or hiking in the mountains, the benefits to our mental health and well-being are undeniable.


References:

Berto, R. (2005). Exposure to restorative environments helps restore attentional capacity. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 25(2), 249-259.

Berto, R. (2014). Nature and well-being. In Handbook of Environmental Psychology (pp. 35-48). Psychology Press.

Berman, M. G., Jonides, J., & Kaplan, S. (2008). The cognitive benefits of interacting with nature. Psychological Science, 19(12), 1207-1212.

Kaplan, S. (1995). The restorative benefits of nature: Toward an integrative framework. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 15(3), 169-182.

Kaplan, R., & Kaplan, S. (1989). The experience of nature: A psychological perspective. Cambridge University Press.

Manski, C., Peterman, C., & Gaher, R. (2015). The effects of nature exposure on cognitive function and mental well-being. Environmental Science & Technology, 49(12), 7278-7284.

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